Mosul: the persecution of Catholics in Iraq

An acceptable prejudice? Many contend that anti-Catholicism is on the rise.

Mosul: the persecution of Catholics in Iraq

Postby seamas o dalaigh » Wed Jul 23, 2014 10:47 pm

When is silence from Western leaders a shrewd political strategy and when is it simply cowardice?


When is silence a shrewd political strategy and when is it simply cowardice? That is the question we must ask this week as western leaders remain silent as the faithful are driven out of Mosul by Islamists determined to end the 1,600-year Christian presence in the city.

As we search for an answer, it’s instructive to reflect on the dilemma Pius XII faced during the Second World War. At first, he encouraged the Church to speak out forcefully in defence of the Jewish people. Inspired by his words, the Dutch bishops issued a pastoral letter in 1942 protesting against the deportation of Jews. The Nazis responded by intensifying the persecution.



http://www.catholicherald.co.uk/comment ... hristians/

There is a clear way to distinguish strategic silence from its craven variant. Although Pius XII was circumspect after the Dutch experience, he worked consistently behind the scenes to preserve Jewish lives. His relative public silence concealed decisive action. What does the silence of Cameron, Hollande, Merkel and Obama conceal? It’s just possible they are working quietly to rescue Iraqi minorities fleeing ISIS (not just Christians, but also Mandaeans, Shabaks, Shiite Turkmen and Yazidis). But there is no evidence we are aware of to suggest this is the case.

Silence is morally justified when speaking out would endanger a covert rescue mission. But to the best of our knowledge, western leaders have essentially abandoned Iraq’s minorities to their predators. The silence that accompanies this betrayal is surely of the cowardly rather than the statesmanlike variety.





By way of background,

The Chaldean Catholic Church (Classical Syriac: ܥܕܬܐ ܟܠܕܝܬܐ ܩܬܘܠܝܩܝܬܐ; ʿītha kaldetha qāthuliqetha), is an Eastern Syriac particular church of the Catholic Church, maintaining full communion with the Bishop of Rome and the rest of the Catholic Church. The Chaldean Catholic Church presently comprises an estimated 500,000 people who are ethnic Assyrians indigenous to northern Iraq, and areas bordering it in southeast Turkey, northeast Syria and northwest Iran.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaldean_Catholic_Church

Assyrians of all denominations, and other religious minorities in Iraq, have endured extensive persecution since 2003, including the abductions and murders of their religious leaders, threats of violence or death if they do not abandon their homes and businesses, and the bombing or destruction of their churches and other places of worship. All this has occurred as anti-Christian emotions rise within Iraq after the American invasion and the fall of Saddam Hussain in 2003 and the rise of Militant Jihadists and religious militias.[17]

Father Ragheed Aziz Ganni, the pastor of the Chaldean Church of the Holy Spirit in Mosul who graduated from the Pontifical University of Saint Thomas Aquinas, Angelicum in Rome in 2003 with a licentiate in ecumenical theology, was killed on 3 June 2007 in Mosul, Iraq alongside the subdeacons Basman Yousef Daud, Wahid Hanna Isho, and Gassan Isam Bidawed, after he celebrated mass.

Chaldean Archbishop Paulos Faraj Rahho and three companions were abducted on 29 February 2008, Mosul, Iraq, and murdered a few days later.

James Daly
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Re: Mosul: the persecution of Catholics in Iraq

Postby seamas o dalaigh » Thu Jul 24, 2014 1:46 am

"The International Union of Muslim Scholars (IUMS) condemns the forced expulsion of the Christian brothers of Iraq from their homes, cities and provinces," the group said in a statement posted on the website of its leader, the influential cleric Sheikh Youssef al-Qaradawi on Tuesday.


http://news.yahoo.com/islamic-scholars- ... 56878.html

"These are acts that violate Islamic laws, Islamic conscience and leave but a negative image of Islam and Muslims."

The IUMS, comprising senior Sunni religious scholars from around the world with links to more moderate factions of the Muslim Brotherhood, views the Islamic State, which has taken control of a swathe of northern Iraq, as being too extreme and says its doctrine contradicts the true teachings of Islam.

It has rejected the Islamic State's declaration of a caliphate in Iraq and Syria as illegal under Muslim law, saying such a development can only be made after enough legitimate representatives of Muslim peoples have pledged their allegiance.



The IUMS urged the Islamic State to allow Christians to return to their homes, saying the forced expulsion amounts to "spreading discord", a serious crime in traditional Muslim law.

"They (Christians) are native sons of Iraq and not intruders," it said. "The aim must be to bury discord, unite the ranks and solve Iraq's problems, rather than thrusting it into matters that would further complicate the situation," it added.

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